Beyond ATAR

Beyond ATAR

Debate about the need for a better measurement of student achievement has been growing. Unless measures change, schools cannot change.

Many educators, parents, employers and community leaders have known that an ATAR score can no longer represent the kinds of skills and attitudes important for students to have in the changing world.

Beyond ATAR: Proposal for Change was prompted by ALL’s second lecture, The New Success, delivered by Charles Fadel (Center for Curriculum Redesign, Harvard) who challenged Australia to change its secondary school assessment.

Charles argued that scores based on standardized testing measured only a small portion of what students need for the future today. He argued that memorisation of traditional subject matter was not enough. The changing world meant that students needed a range of capabilities to succeed.

This view was supported by Jennifer Westacott, Chief Executive of the Business Council of Australia, who in introducing Charles, contended that ATAR made it easy for universities to pick students, but did not serve students with the learning experiences that allows them to reach their full potential.

Following on from the lecture, Australian Learning Lecture brought together experts and multiple stakeholders to produce a report with three major recommendations forming a way forward.

The report has had wide public take up and significant impact, informing The Review of Senior Secondary Pathways into Work, Further Education and Training led by an expert Panel chaired by Professor Peter Shergold AC.

Charles Fadel

Charles Fadel

Charles Fadel is a global education thought leader and futurist, author and inventor, with several active affiliations; his work spans the continuum of Schools, Higher Education, and Workforce Development/Lifelong Learning. Charles is Founder and chairman of the Center for Curriculum Redesign (Boston, Massachusetts). He is also Chair of the Education Committee of the Business and Industry Advisory Committee (BIAC) to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), nominated by the US Chamber of International Business (USCIB). He works with several teams at the OECD – Education 2030, PISA, and CERI most notably.

The New Success Lecture

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